Risk

Those are the three types of risk mindsets in the world:

• Those who know stuff breaks and attempt to survive the breaks long enough to experience the eventual growth that occurs when people learn and improve from the breaks.

• Those who think stuff doesn’t break and are broken when it does.

• Those whose experience being broken leads them to believe there’s no such thing as eventual growth.

Optimist, complacentist, pessimist.

Morgan Housel – Collaborative Fund

Travel is No Cure for the Mind

We tend to grossly overestimate the pleasure brought forth by new experiences and underestimate the power of finding meaning in current ones.

Gratitude is what allows you to feel that same sense of wonderment about your day-to-day life as you would if you were walking the streets of a faraway city.

While travel does expand and stretch the horizons of what we know about the world, it is not the answer we’re looking for in times of unrest. To strengthen the health of the mind, the venue to do that in is the one we are in now.

More to That

Map of California State Parks

We live a couple miles from a state park with two lakes. We visit the park a couple days each month and there are a number of other state parks nearby, so it made sense to buy an annual pass (California Poppy Pass).

The pass came with a list of all the state parks that are included1 but a random list of parks isn’t very useful, so I added each park to a Google Map (I’m also slightly obsessed with maps, but that’s a different story):


  1.  popular state parks, like the beaches in southern California, are excluded from the pass. I didn’t include those state parks on this map. 

Goodbye Twitter

I stopped using Twitter about three months ago.  For a few years I was an active consumer of Twitter content, but never tweeted much.  I would religiously log into Tweetbot (both macOS and iOS) and view all the new tweets in my timeline.

Over the last year or so, it became more like a chore.  It was sort of like another inbox.  And the U.S. presidential campaign was exhausting, so I started muting a lot of keywords.

Now that I’ve been away, I don’t miss it.  I sort of miss seeing links to interesting articles, but not enough to lure me back.

Possibly the biggest benefit of mostly avoiding Twitter is that I no longer need to endure inane April Fool’s Day jokes and pranks.

The second biggest benefit is that I no longer need to be involved in the Twitter outrage machine. It’s easy to get caught up with one side or the other, but on Twitter there’s no nuance, so everything is polarizing.

And lastly, it’s nice to have an extra 30+ minutes per day to devote to other activities. Like writing a short blog post…

Goodbye Twitter.